The Intelligent Workplace

The Intelligent Workplace

Episode 25

Devastation, deep-thought & self-love: a mindfulness journey

​Nina Purewal
Author at Pure Minds​​

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
 
My guest on this podcast is Nina Purewal, founder of Pure Minds and co-author of the best selling book, Let That S##t Go. Having studied mindfulness for 20 years, the book is a no filter approach on how to find peace of mind and happiness in the everyday.
 
Nina develops mindfulness strategies with clients such as Deloitte, Viacom, and Red Bull. In doing so she drives focus, efficiency, team cohesiveness, and employee contentment.
 
Sit down, take a few deep breaths and press play…it’s time to go on a mindfulness journey. This episode is like nothing else I have recorded, it is a raw and honest conversation about life, love and loss. And of course, how to Let That S##t Go on the road to recovery. The conversation goes off on a few tangents, which I did not edit out, as I felt it would detract from the authenticity of the conversation.
 
Episode Links

Chris:                    

Welcome to The Intelligent Workplace podcast, Nina Purewal.

Nina:                    

Thank you. Thanks so much, Chris, for having me.

Chris:                    

It’s wonderful to have you here. The fact that we’re at opposite ends of the Earth is just fantastic. I’m loving it.

Nina:                    

It’s incredible.

Chris:                    

Yeah. Now look, you’ve been studying mindfulness for a long, long time. Do you sometimes feel like people don’t quite understand what mindfulness actually is?

Nina:                    

I get a lot of questions about what is mindfulness, because I think it’s having a bit of a yoga moment that yoga had in the ’90s, so it’s this crazy buzz term right now, so I’ve got a lot of questions of what exactly is mindfulness, because it is a tough and a little subtle concept to grasp.

Chris:                    

Because I think sometimes people just think it’s meditation, don’t they?

Nina:                    

Yeah, they think it’s meditation or they think it’s being in the moment all the time, and there’s a lot of misconceptions out there about what it actually is.

Chris:                    

So what do you give people as your elevator pitch for mindfulness?

Nina:                    

So the elevator pitch that I give is mindfulness is about being fully present. So just being in the here and now and being in the moment, so the simple example is if you’re going for a walk along the beach, are you actually just simply walking along the beach or are you thinking about the past, and thinking about the future, and thinking about your to-do list, and thinking about all the things you have to do at work, or that argument you’ve got in with someone? Your mind is constantly going into all these places, so mindfulness is just to go bringing you back to the here and now and feeling the sand on your feet, and the wind against your skin, and breathing in the fresh hair.

Chris:                    

Oh, I’m with you, I’m with you. It’s really powerful thing, mindfulness, but along the lines of it being misunderstood, I think also people seem to believe that it’s a cure all for all of your bad thoughts, but it’s really an overall plan, isn’t it?

Nina:                    

It is, and we talk a lot about thoughts in the books and in our workshops and the fact that these thoughts that we have, it’s part of our mind’s job to think thoughts, so the thoughts never really go away. Not to make that sound discouraging, because I still have negative thoughts, I still have challenging thoughts, and I’ve been practicing this for 20 years. But what happens when you practice mindfulness is that the relationships with your thoughts change, so they might not trigger you or affect you as much as they used to, because they still come, but how you interact with those thoughts internally changes when you practice mindfulness.

Chris:                    

That whole idea of being present, I actually find it really difficult sometimes, because my mind tends to wander quite easily. How can I be better at that?

Nina:                    

That’s a great question. I think there’s another misconception about mindfulness that you are present 24/7, or you have an attitude where you’re fully present, right? And the way I like to think about it is that your mind is constantly wandering and mindfulness is just about bringing it back, and bringing it back, and bringing it back. I have it have an example of I asked one of my teachers when I was studying, I was in corporate, and I was really stressed out, and I said, “This whole being present thing is a bunch of BS. How do you actually do it?” And he gave me a very practical example, and he said, “Start by speaking out loud or speaking in your mind what you are doing.” So let’s say you’re doing the dishes, your dialogue is going to start sounding something like this. “Now I’m putting soap on the sponge. Now I’m making circular motions on this pot. Now I’m rinsing this pot. Now I’m putting his pot on the drying rack.”

Nina:                    

Same goes for when you’re out for a walk or when you’re in the shower. It’s like, are you ever actually in the shower? Are you ever actually out for a walk? Are you ever actually doing the dishes? Note that, let’s say you practice this with doing dishes. I know you’re laughing, because it sounds totally crazy, but when you do this, it brings you back to the here and now. In a 15 minute span of you doing the dishes, you might have to bring your mind back 30 times.

Chris:                    

Wow.

Nina:                    

Yeah. Even me, a mindfulness practitioner, it’s not like in 15 minutes I am fully present the whole time. It’s just that I’m aware that my mind runs off, and then I bring it back. We think between 50,000 and 70,000 thoughts a day, right? So it’s just about being aware of those thoughts and bringing them back.

Nina:                    

Another really great tool is to lean into your senses. So in that moment, what are you touching? What are you smelling? What are you tasting? And that gets you inherently into the here and now.

Chris:                    

Oh wow. Well here I am looking at my computer screen, talking into my microphone right now. Is that working? Is that what I’m meant to be doing?

Nina:                    

Yes, exactly. You got it. You’ve mastered it. That’s it.

Chris:                    

So what actually led you to dedicate so much of your life to the out of mindfulness?

Nina:                    

Well, if I can be totally honest and vulnerable, when I was 16, I went through a pretty horrific tragedy. I lost my dad and my younger brother very unexpectedly.

Chris:                    

Oh, I’m so sorry.

Nina:                    

And it was at that time that I started to really question what is life all about and what’s my purpose? Why am I here? I started getting into studying mindfulness, and meditation, and just classical spiritual philosophy, even if you will. I went down a traditional path of getting my business degree and having a great career, but I always kept my studies of mindfulness with me, as well. I found that with all the therapists I saw, and psychologist, and child psychiatrists, and support groups, the one thing that kept me grounded, that kept me happy, that kept me fulfilled and peaceful was my mindfulness practice. And so that’s why after a number of years in corporate, I said, “I really want to mix my passion and my business sense, and I really want to help other people find calm in chaos, and know that through adversity you can find that happiness, because this is how I found it.” And so that’s why I’m so passionate about [inaudible] teaching it today.

Chris:                    

It’s amazing out of such tragedy you’ve been able to find something that can help you get through. Yeah, I really have no words. I wasn’t aware of the situation around your tragedy in doing my research. It wasn’t sort of mentioned, but I can understand how you would be searching for something. Did it take you a long time to find mindfulness from the age of 16 onwards?

Nina:                    

It’s been a journey. It’s been a journey. So when I started studying, it was in the mid ’90s, and the word mindfulness wasn’t even really existed. Right? So it was kind of more meditation had and classical spiritual philosophy, so Hinduism, Buddhism, and that’s kind of where I started studying. It’s been this journey and as I have gone along in the most recent years as I worked in corporate, mindfulness is kind of the one thing that really helped me, because it’s like, wow, my mind can be my worst enemy or my best friend, and how do I lean into my mind and all of these thoughts that I’m thinking and all these overwhelming feelings of anxiety, or depression, or jealousy, or anger? How do I help myself by better understanding those emotions? That’s kind of where I … I don’t think, and I asked one of my teachers this, I said, “When do you actually get there where you’re just in practice all the time?” And he looked at me and he said, “Nina, it’s not a destination. It’s a journey.” So I feel like it’s this constant evolution of practice, and the deeper you go, the more you find and the more there is to unravel.

Chris:                    

Yeah. And then so you fast forward into your adult life and you say you’ve sort of worked in the corporate life and all that sort of thing, and then in recent times you took a 12 month sabbatical, which I’m assuming is what you needed to get the motivation to write this book that you’ve released, which is called Let That Shit Go, and that was with your co-author, Kate. Is that what you needed? You needed that time out to get that head space to share some of your learnings with others?

Nina:                    

Yeah, well, at that point it wasn’t even about sharing. It was about my own journey, and I hit a peak point of stress sparked by the corporate grind and I said, I was addicted to my email, and my Blackberry, or Crackberry as they called it at the time. I was working 24/7. I was constantly in my own head, and I knew something had to change. I had to do something drastic. And so, yeah, I think what happened in that year, because I totally unplugged in that year. I told my friends if they wanted to get a hold of me, they could write me letters, and I sent and received, actually, 150 letters that year. But I, because I didn’t have any distractions in work, in social media, phones, TV, anything, I was able to actually focus on myself.

Nina:                    

And it’s really funny, because when shit comes up for us now, it’s so easy to distract ourselves, to talk to someone, to throw on Netflix, to look at our phones instead of actually deal with what’s going on.

Chris:                    

Dealing with it, yep.

Nina:                    

Yeah. And so when I was living in the ashram and in the Redwoods, when stuff came up for me, it was like it was me in nature and I had to deal with it. And so there was a lot of stuff that I had suppressed and that I had all this knowledge, but I wasn’t really putting it into action, and so that’s the year that I kind of started to own it. That space gave me the ability to really digest what was going on for me and how to apply the knowledge.

Chris:                    

And so what did you actually set out to achieve then in taking those thoughts and those ideas and actually writing about it and then sharing it with people?

Nina:                    

Yeah, so when I came back from the course, I went back into corporate a little bit, for a few more years I worked in cause marketing. I was like I want to do something good. I worked for an environmental company, and then I kind of hit this point of like there are, so I started having a lot of personal conversations with people and I was like, “The world needs this.” 85% of corporate America is highly stressed out. Anxiety’s on the rise. Depression’s on the rise. Not to be a downer, but suicide is on the rise, especially for teens. And so I was like, “I need to do something to spread this knowledge.” And so that’s when I started my business in 2017, and I started just doing workshops. Kate and I did workshops in Toronto on calling them Mindful AF. It was her idea to add all these swearing words, because it just made the more accessible, right? So it was Mindful AF, and we taught Learn How to Fucking Meditate, and they totally went viral, and it was actually HarperCollins, the publishing company, that approached us and said, “Hey, do you want to turn these workshop into book material?” Because I had no plans on writing a book.

Chris:                    

Well, great.

Nina:                    

And so that’s how it came to fruition, how Let That Shit Go came to fruition, is just like from us putting all this content out there.

Chris:                    

So concept of leaving things in the past, drawing a line in the sand, it’s not that easy. I mean, you obviously went through that yourself, but what’s the best way to get started with the whole mindset of letting shit go?

Nina:                    

That’s a great question. I think the biggest thing to allow yourself to do is to be aware of the shit you’re holding onto. Every chapter focuses on all the shit we’re holding onto. So one chapter is about self love and how we are constantly badgering ourselves. 80% of our thoughts are actually negative and they’re self-deprecating, and so being aware of those thoughts is kind of the first step. Another chapter we talk about perspective, looking at life from a big picture perspective, because we’re so into the nitty gritty. So we hold on to all of these things.

Nina:                   

If you think of children, if you think of toddlers, they’re inherently happy. They’re inherently peaceful. They cry if they’re hungry or if they’re tired. So what has happened over time as adults, as we enter into adulthood is we’ve had it all this shit into our lives, and I think the first step is realizing what shit we’re holding onto and the moment we can look at it, which is, you’re right, it’s not easy. It’s really hard. And I had to go through a whole journey with the loss of my dad and brother to bring that forward again and to say there’s all this grief that I haven’t dealt with. The moment that I could bring it up and deal with it, which is hard. It’s not easy to deal with the emotions and to bring them to surface, but the moment I could do that is a moment that I could let go, because if you’re not acknowledging it, then you’re in suppression mode. We talk a lot in the book about the importance of not just being like, “Oh, this happened, let it go.” It’s not that simple. It’s important to first recognize the things you’re holding onto, bring them to surface, acknowledge them, deal with them, and then let them go.

Chris:                    

This is feeling a little bit like a bit of a therapy session for me here today. I’m not saying in a lighthearted manner. I wasn’t going to mention this, but you obviously you’ve really shared with me here. Maybe I’ll share back. About 13 years ago now, my wife and I, we had a really devastating event in our life, as well. Our young son, Tom, was born and died pretty much immediately, which was, as you know, a massive, massive thing, and sort of once I started to deal with it all, I adopted this whole mantra of not sweating the small stuff, which I think pretty much aligns to what you’re talking about. You know, don’t worry about the little things in life, just get on with the important stuff. But, I think sometimes people take that as me being a little bit, I don’t know, blasé, or uninterested perhaps, but I think it’s a bit of a self preservation tactic for my mind, but maybe I’ve been going about it the wrong way.

Nina:                    

First of all, thank you so much for sharing that, and I can’t imagine the sorrow and the grief that you both went through. That’s just so tragic and heartbreaking.

Chris:                    

I just felt we’re in a good place here. It was a good conversation to be having I think. Yeah.

Nina:                    

Yeah. So, I would say there’s kind of two parts to your thought, and one is I agree with you, too, the whole not sweating the small stuff is such a great tool. And when we talk about it in a perspective chapter, because when losing my dad and brother has really helped me put into perspective, that life into perspective and not sweat the small stuff. So when I was at work, it was like nothing was as stressful as losing half my family.

Chris:                    

No, yeah.

Nina:                    

The stress doesn’t compare, and I agree too. Sometimes you can’t relate to people, because they’re really stressed about little things and you’re just like, “That is not as stressful.” We have this exercise where it’s like when do you wake up in the morning, what do you stress about? Write it all down, and then    everything from one to 10. I work with a lot of corporate executives, and it’s like, “I have the most stressful job, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10.” Then I asked them, “What is the worst possible thing that could happen to you or someone you love? What is the worst possible thing?” Obviously, it’s all always life and death, right?

Chris:                    

Yeah, yep.

Nina:                    

And I said, “So now rank that. What is that?” “Oh, okay, a 10.” “Okay, so what is your work stress now?”

Chris:                    

Yeah.

Nina:                    

You know, because that’s probably not a 10. So I think there’s so much validity in that, and I think that’s a very, very powerful tool, and I love that you do that. I think if that’s where you are, that’s fantastic.

Nina:                    

Where the cautionary piece is, is have you, not you personally, but any challenge you went through, there was a lot of stuff surrounding my dad and my brother that I hadn’t dealt with. I’m going to be even more vulnerable here and share, and I talk about this in the book, but it was actually a murder-suicide.

Chris:                    

Oh, my god.

Nina:                    

And had life, the situation that night been different, my dad was planning on taking me, too, and so there was a lot of anger. A lot of anger that as a child that I had towards him that I never dealt with, and it was just like, okay, it’s fine. Don’t sweat the small stuff, dah, dah, dah. But I didn’t deal with my anger, and I realized my only way out of this, of holding on to all this, is to forgive him. So there’s a whole chapter on forgiveness and my journey there.

Nina:                    

But so there was unresolved stuff, right? There was unresolved stuff there. So I think if there’s no unresolved stuff, and you’ve kind of dealt with it, and you’ve gone through the grief, and you and your wife have healed in the way that you felt was best, and now you’re in a place of don’t sweat the small stuff, that’s fantastic. But if there’s stuff that’s still lingering for anyone going through challenges that you’re holding on to, and I didn’t even realize I was holding onto it, but the minute I realized was when I could bring it to surface, and I spent about a year pragmatically understanding how to forgive, going through all the motions, and it was really, really challenging, but once I did that, it was like a huge weight. And honestly that’s when my business came forward. That’s when my book launched, and so many magical things happened for me because I wasn’t holding onto the past anymore. So I think only you know where you are in your journey, and if you’re in a good place with it, then yeah, absolutely. Don’t sweat the small stuff.

Chris:                    

I’m absolutely gobsmacked here this morning where this interview has actually gone in terms of how much we’re … thank you so much for sharing that this morning.

Nina:                    

You, too.

Chris:                    

Oh wow. I almost feel like I have to take up a breath for a second.

Nina:                    

Take a breath. Just take a breath.

Chris:                    

Just to compose myself. It’s just amazing that out of everything you’ve been through, that you’ve been able to find that silver lining in that very, very dark cloud and turn it into something positive, which is this book that is helping so many people, and it is helping so many people, because you’re a bestselling author this book now, aren’t you?

Nina:                    

Yeah. Actually, we just found out we were in the top 10 nonfiction Canadian authors of 2019, so that’s exciting.

Chris:                    

That’s amazing.

Nina:                    

Super, super exciting.

Chris:                    

It feels like there’s a potential second book that they might need to write if you’re doing that well.

Nina:                    

There’s talk of it. There’s talk of it. Yeah, it might be on the list for 2020, so yeah. Yeah. I mean, like I said earlier, the biggest thing for Kate and I is that it’s helping people and it’s impacting lives, and that’s how we kind of define success over anything monetary.

Chris:                    

It’s interesting. Before you were talking about the stressed out executives and all that sort of thing, and being that I work for a tech company, I was interested to know what your thoughts are around where does technology play a part in this? I mean, I learned how to meditate myself with an app on my phone, but I also can see that the phone itself can be a little bit evil, because it’s always on, and it’s always letting me know what’s going on elsewhere and distracting me. So do you see technology as a help or a hindrance in what you’re trying to achieve here?

Nina:                    

Yeah, it’s a very interesting question, and I think it’s both. It’s really important to understand where tech is helping you and where tech is hindering. And especially with social media, I would say a couple of things. One is set boundaries for yourself. A lot of people intend to scroll Instagram for five minutes, and they’re there half an hour later.

Chris:                    

Yeah.

Nina:                    

So, just if you want to have phone time, like, hey, it’s relaxing. It activates your parasympathetic nervous system. It’s a way to kind of just decompress, and that’s fine. But if you’re finding that you’re needing it to, you’re becoming addicted to it and an hour goes by, then be aware of that, and set boundaries for yourself and be aware. We call it the tech hangover or the Instagram hangover.

Nina:                    

Also, be aware of what you’re doing on there. I make it a point to follow people who I believe in, who believe in the things that I’m passionate about, but a lot of people are end up scrolling the ex-boyfriend from high school that they let get away, or that person that they couldn’t stand in corporate that’s now like a CEO or a founder of some big company, and it’s like stop with the toxicity. You’re doing it to yourself, so really be aware in tech of when you’re using it, is it making you feel good or are you in inadvertently kind of badgering yourself because you end up looking at all these people who you don’t feel up to snuff with.

Nina:                    

Then I would also say that people, especially when it comes to social media, I’ll get to corporate in a second, but when it comes to social media, people need to be aware of that what people are posting or their highlight reels. I mean more and more people are becoming a little bit more vulnerable, but it’s like that vacation and then this promotion I got, and this crazy party that I went to, and this art gallery, and dah, dah, dah. It’s like nobody’s talking about the shitty fights that they’re having, or the fact that their flight got delayed, or the nights they’re crying themselves to sleep. No one’s posting about that. So if you’re on there comparing yourself to everybody’s highlight reel and top 2% of life, you’re not comparing yourself to anyone that actually exists.

Chris:                    

Yep.

Nina:                    

So being aware of that is very important that what people are putting out there, and especially for teens, because I feel like they sometimes don’t have that perspective, that the beautiful selfies that are being filtered a thousand times, it’s not real.

Nina:                    

And when it comes to corporate, being someone who used to be addicted to work and all that stuff, I think it’s so important and I hope companies are being more and more advocates of shutting down at five, having reasonable work hours, allowing people to unplug on vacation. This whole notion of like taking work on vacation, no wonder people are so stressed out, no wonder people are angry, like taking their paid time off and working. You need that mental break if you want more. So when I managed my last team I managed, it was a team of eight, and I realized when they were working on vacation, they were coming back like more pissed off, more tired, more miserable, because it’s like they used their vacation time, they’re on the beach. So I implemented a rule, no working on vacation. I don’t want to hear from you. Don’t even take your phone. Don’t even open your emails, take your email off work, off your phone. I found when they were coming back, they were way more refreshed. They were way happier. They wanted to work for the company.

Nina:                    

You’re still thinking about work when you’re on vacation, but when you’re not in the nitty gritty, and the day-to-day, and dealing with this P and L, or this price increase, or dah, dah, dah, you’re thinking strategically, so you’re doing your self a favor, because your employees are going to come back and be so much more open minded about the business. I went away for five days and I left my phone in the safe, and I just took a journal and the stuff I planned out for 2020 was incredible. I was like, “Oh my gosh.” I would think strategically. So, I think there’s so many different things companies can do.

Nina:                    

The other big thing is the email notification.

Chris:                    

Yes.

Nina:                    

That is they’re saying now, there’s been a study that’s done, that said that companies are now losing 20 to 40% of efficiency, because people are so distracted, because you need 25 minutes to get into a flow of what you’re working on, and if you’re constantly having that digging of email, or your phone going off, or people interrupting you, you’re never going to get into a state of flow. So I think there’s certain little techniques that we talk about in the book about finding your tech Zen and how to create that balance, because it’s great. I mean, look at us. We’re halfway around the world recording this podcast. It’s fantastic.

Chris:                    

It is.

Nina:                    

But you need to make sure you’re leveraging it in a positive way.

Chris:                    

So when do you work with your corporates on mindfulness, how do you, sell this? I find it could be difficult to get the corporates to buy into it, because everything’s about KPIs, and return on investment, all that sort of thing. So, are you tying this whole idea into maybe a preventative mental health message when you pitch it, or maybe a message of increased productivity, because you’re going to get people into the right mindset to get the best out of themselves? Or how do you go about it?

Nina:                    

Yeah, that’s one part of it is it definitely helps with focus. It helps with productivity. Mental health is another angle. People are just, companies are losing money because people are taking longterm mental health leaves, right? So I think 10 years ago when I was in corporate, it was all about CSR, right? Corporate social responsibility, what are you doing for the environment? And all that stuff is still very important, but now I think things have come to a bit of a head where it’s like, well what are you doing for me as a stressed out employee? And the way I talk about it is like if you want your employees to be happy, if you want them to be calm, if you want them to be peaceful, which therefore leads to effectiveness, and efficiency, and focus, and which leads to obviously increased revenues, then you got to take care of your people. In my previous role, I always told my global CEO, I said, “Our company, our country P and L is like just as important as the people I manage.”

Chris:                    

Yep.

Nina:                    

And so I think having that perspective for companies and knowing that they need to invest in their people is kind of a great starting point for me. That’s what it’s about for me, is just impacting those lives at the end of the day.

Chris:                    

So what do you think has been the most important lesson you’ve learned through this whole 20 year mindfulness journey?

Nina:                    

Oh my gosh.

Chris:                    

Just one.

Nina:                    

That’s a great question. Just one. I think the most important lesson I’ve learned, I don’t know. There’s probably so many, but one of the most is that you are not your mind. Your mind loves to play tricks on you. It loves to get the best of you. It loves to take you down all these spirals, and from the traditional spirituality that I studied, it’s like we are all one. You are consciousness, you are love, you are peace, you are joy, you are bliss. And I think we forget that. We forget our true nature. We forget who we are, because our mind just takes over, and so the minute we can get a better handle on our mind by understanding how to deal with this crazy mind of ours is the minute that we can live a more peaceful life, and I think that’s what’s helped me most is that I am not my mind. I’m not my thoughts. I am much more than that, and how do I then deal with this one small part of me.

Chris:                    

That is beautiful. I actually thought you were going to go with the learn to love yourself angle there-

Nina:                    

Oh, that’s so important, too.

Chris:                    

… because that’s a big, big takeaway from all the reading that I’ve been doing, and without sounding cheesy, the Whitney Houston song is true. The first step is willing to love yourself.

Nina:                    

It’s so true. But that is part of the mind, right? Because as I said earlier, 80% of the thoughts we think are negative self talk. We have a little tip, the book is filled with a hundred tips on how to be more mindful, and one of them is stop being such an asshole to yourself.

Chris:                    

Fair enough.

Nina:                    

So that’s part of the mind, is self love. Self love for me is not bubble baths, and spa dates, and days on the golf course. It is, but it’s also at the crack. What are you saying to yourself? And so I think that’s kind of encompassing is like the self love piece, but yeah, that is also very important.

Chris:                    

And the book, once again, is called Let That Shit Go, available on Amazon and many other great book sellers, of course. Thank you so much, Nina, for this chat today. Sometimes I have these chats and I have my notes, I’m sort of think the conversation’s going a certain direction, and then I meet someone like you, and both of us open up and share things we probably weren’t expecting to share, and this just turned into it a wonderful conversation. So I just want to thank you for your time and that was amazing. Thank you.

Nina:                    

Thank you so much, Chris, for this opportunity, and I really genuinely loved talking to you today. Thank you for sharing as well. That was great.

Chris:                    

Thanks a lot.

More Episodes

From Haiti to Myanmar: Insights from a Crisis Communicator

Paul Conneally is Head of Global Communications at LiveTiles. In the past, Paul led the Public Communications Team for the International Red Cross Crescent and was on the ground in dozens of challenging contexts with conflict and disaster affected communities including Afghanistan, Sudan, Haiti, and most recently Iraq and Myanmar

View Episode

Insights from a Crisis Communicator

Philippe Borremans is an independent Public Relations consultant specializing in Crisis and Risk Communications. He is one of the founders of Reputation & Co., a network of senior communications consultants active in Europe and Northern Africa.
Philippe has held high level international communications roles in companies such as IBM, Porter Novelli and the Van Marcke Trading Group. He is also a regular guest lecturer at the International University of Casablanca, the ISCAE Business School and several universities in Morocco, France, Belgium and Italy.

View Episode

Real world Artificial Intelligence

Callum is the Chair of AI Australia. He is a keynote speaker, author, entrepreneur, and has 20 years of global business experience.

AI Australia is a diverse group of companies that are at the forefront of AI technology in Australia.

View Episode