The Intelligent Workplace

The Intelligent Workplace

Episode 1

Technology layers in the Intelligent Workplace

James Dellow, Chief Technology Solutions

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James Dellow describes himself as a human-centered designer and technology strategist. The attributes make him the perfect guest for this new podcast series.
 
This series is all about exploring the many possibilities the Intelligent Workplace presents. Where can we go with it, how do we get there and what technologies will we pick up for the ride along the way. In this episode, James focuses on the human element of the Intelligent Workplace.
 
James is an engaging presenter and a much sought after public speaker. He is a veteran media performer and a published author, with a Masters in Business & Technology. Enjoy the conversation, there is so much we can learn from him.

Chris:
James Dellow describes himself as a human centered designer and technology strategist, which makes him the perfect guest for this new podcast series. You see, this series is all about exploring the possibilities in the world of tech that the intelligent workplace presents. Where can we go with it? How do we get there? What technologies will we pick up for the ride along the way? Today James is going to help me to begin my journey into the world of the intelligent workplace with a bit of a focus on the people aspect in his first episode. James is a human centric solution designer and an engaging presenter who you may have seen discussing digital transformation and the future workplace at events such as work, tick and the center for workplace leadership’s future of work conference. He’s been quoted in newspapers, appeared on television, has a masters in business and technology and he’s a published author. I feel like I’m going to learn a lot from him today, so welcome to the Intelligent Workplace Podcast, James Delo.

James:
Hi, Chris. This is very nice to be chatting with you today.

Chris:
Thank you so much for joining me today. I’m really excited to have you on as my first guest on this new podcast journey.

James:
That’s fantastic. Really good to be here.

Chris:
There is so much to get into on this topic, but before we do, why don’t you share with our listeners a bit about your background in this space, and then they’ll understand I think why I was so keen to get you on.

James:
Sure. So my background has really been… I guess, helping organizations for quite a while with trying to get the technology right around anything related to collaboration, knowledge work, information work, getting things done inside an organization using technology. In more recent years, I’ve started to get involved, not just with what we might call the digital layer of work, but also looking at the physical layer of work and how the technology and the physical layers come together. Because obviously at work it doesn’t happen all the digital work you like, doesn’t happen in a vacuum. We’re always working somewhere or with someone even if we’re not physically sitting next to them.

Chris:
Well, I think that makes you the perfect guest. What I would like to leave the listeners with at the end of this podcast, is a bit of a picture, a definition if will, of what the intelligent workplace is. And that’s where you come in. But it seems to me that it’s a bit of a moving target because of the rapid changes in technology Cerenia it. To get started, why don’t you give me your elevator pitch of what you believe [inaudible 00:02:11] to be right now?

James:
Sure. I know we’re going to focus on the people side, but it’s actually pretty hard I think to really truly disconnect technology from people. For my money, we’ve got to step back and look at the big picture initially and then we can zoom in and focus on the people aspects specifically. Now I sort of look at this through a lens. I’ve got a bit of an architecture. I’ve been building a reference architecture for the role of technology in the workplace. And I start at that physical building layer and I build my way up and I think the intelligent workplace, there’s a very practical efficiency layer and we might see that in the way that we assigned space and monitor how space is being used. There’s also automation, things like the environmental controls. Is it too hot or too cold? And if you’re working in a building, those are the factors [inaudible 00:02:58] and they can be improved through different feedback mechanisms and made intelligent, so we can really have that optimal physical workplace experience.

James:
As we move up through that. Then we get into the, what I call the productivity layer around work support tools and the kit of parts, which is there a combination of a software and hardware. We all need to get our jobs done. And certainly there’s a role there for using intelligence to make that work support as a, I guess, efficient and it’s clever as possible. So whether that’s around the broad basics of productivity, which might be using a smart email client to prioritize the most important emails to also looking at analytics that can help us to improve how teams perform. There’s a lot of opportunity in that productivity layer. Then there’s another layer on top of that, which I think is really… it’s becoming increasingly important as a differentiator.

James:
The productivity layer, it’s really about the quality and the more you invest in good productivity support, the better the outcomes going to be. But then we look at the experience layer and this is what I think we can differentiate because that’s going to be even more reflective or things like culture and innovation and the values of an organization about what other people think is important. And again, the intelligent workplace can play a role here, whether that’s around the personalization of that experience of being in the workplace or it might be around innovation and knowledge sharing. It can also be around health and wellbeing. There are a number of areas where we apply intelligence, build a smarter workplace to can actually anticipate and also provide the capabilities to deliver certain experiences. Now in terms of patients setting is the scene.

Chris:
I’ll just going to say luckily we’re on a very long elevator trip together. That’s right. That’s right.

James:
It’s a small elevator [crosstalk 00:04:40] to talk to you. But I think it’s important to say that scene. The productivity layer, as I say it, the elevator pitch is about quality. The more you invest in that productivity support, the better the outcome is going to be. On the experience layer. This is really where we’re getting to the real important things though, because you can go to any organization if they’ve invested well in productivity, you’re going to enjoy that. But it might not be enough to keep you engaged. It might not be enough to keep you working at that organization. That productivity layer is ashy and what I call a hygiene factor. You’ll know if it’s wrong and you’ll be disappointed. But it’s the experience layer and how we make that smarter, that’s going to be the thing that makes you want to work in an organization. It can be the thing that impresses you.

Chris:
I feel like there’s such a focus on user experience these days within the intelligent workplace, but also for many companies, the user experience wasn’t even a consideration. Only a few years ago was it?

James:
No. Look, there was a running joke that certain enterprise applications. The people that built that software, they were paid based on the number of complex screens they could create, their job was always to make it a bad experience for you. And of course, I’m thinking of things like expense claims. The expense claim. Your employer, I guess the system owner, they know that you want to get your money back from that work expense. There’s no motivation for them to make that a great user experience. But yes, you’re right. Because people have now seen them. Particularly, you go outside of an we know what a good digital experiences and we come back into the work workplace who go, “Hang on, why am I being made to click 10 times to do a really simple transaction that’s taken me half an hour to calculate this task?” Yeah, that’s not good enough. No, not at all. So user experience is becoming more and more important. And I think that back to here is there are two sides. One is if you’ve got a system or a process or a strategy that requires people to voluntarily engage with that solution or system and perhaps maybe to contribute above and beyond what their job description says.

James:
It’s that sort of organizational citizenship behavior you’re going to have to deliver a really good user experience. So that’s sort of on one side. The other side is really literally, “Don’t waste my time.” Things are moving fast and if I’m trying to serve a customer more effectively, and that’s both other simple frontline level of can I process is transaction well to… I’m dealing with a customer, the complex problem. If it’s going to take me days to resolve, you have those they’re both ends of that spectrum. It is a problem. It’s a combination of voluntary citizenship behavior and the passive service delivery is increasing and clunky applications. It just don’t cut it anymore.

Chris:
It feels like the technology is moving so fast. And we’re now allowing ourselves to reimagine what it means to interact and collaborate at the workplace and giving birth to this intelligent world plus idea. I feel like it’s a really, really exciting time to be in the tech space to you.

James:
Oh, definitely. For many years I was chatting to people, technologists, HR people, comps people, even architects, and we had ideas about how we would like to better engage with employees and the kinds of solutions we’d like to provide to them. But yeah, really it was, it was kind of blue sky dreaming. I remember talking many years ago to some people in the organization, it was one of the early coworking spaces and they had access to one of the first digital cordless phones. So you know, the analog ones were good, but they had a short range. And then they introduce digital cordless phones and they extended the range well. The receptionist could go down to the cafe at the bottom of the building to get coffee orders for people and she could still answer the phone. And they thought that was amazing. That was cutting edge. Having a cordless phone with a good range. Mobile Computing, cloud computing, they really are critical elements of what has changed by the ability but also our aspiration of what workplace technology should do, what the ad that experience should be.

James:
So you’re right, it’s not just a feeling that things are moving faster. We have opened this box of tricks and all of a sudden we’ve got all this fantastic stuff to play with. And guess what? There’s more to come because we’ve got augmented reality, we’ve got digital twins, there’s so much going on and so much more we can do.

Chris:
How do you see all these fast moving changes, improving sociability amongst colleagues, which can ultimately lead to improved collaboration in the workplace?

James:
Well this I talking earlier about setting the scene and talking about this architecture. This is why I sort of divide the world between this idea that there is some physical infrastructure for example, and there’s a lot of technology in the physical workplace these days and whether that’s a proper office or your Home Office, I’ve had to switch off Alexa for a little bit while we’re talking, because she’ll jump in and disturb us. It doesn’t matter where you are, where you’re working, There’s a base technology layer. Let me call that productivity layer. The trouble is, that productivity layer now allows us to work in very different models. We can have everyone working together. And again, technology has the potential to enhance or detract from that co located experience. We might have a hybrid model where some people were together and you’ve got people scattered around and then we can have that true remote model. And the real extreme of true remote is everyone working at different times and different places.

Chris:
Yes.

James:
That creates challenges for us because we’re not robots. If you need a robot, get a robot. Humans are social creatures. Even if you’re a bit introverted, you still want some kind of social support. That’s going to feed into your level of engagement in the workplace. I mean, we won’t go into it now, but there’s plenty of studies around workplace loneliness, for example. It’s a huge issue today.

Chris:
I feel like that could really affect engagement with the overall business as well.

James:
Oh, definitely. When we look at the history of people working in remote or tele work settings is often being framed in a bit of a them and us. So there’s everyone back at the office and then there’s these weirdos sort of working invisibly somewhere. There’s always been a bit of a tension of, “Oh yeah, we’re in the office where the real work is. Here we are at nine, we’re out at five. We’re doing the hard jobs. What’s that guy doing at home? Who knows what he’s doing? He’s probably feeding his cat. There is always been this sort of issue. What we’ve forgotten though, conversely is that person that’s working remotely, is wondering, “Does everyone, anyone know I’m here? Do they value my contribution? Can I say that I am actually contributing?” I’ve come to realize that really effectiveness of the workplace today and where we have these different models is really sort of not looking at it as a they Manasseh issue, but it’s everyone together and how can we work effectively regardless of where you are at a particular time.

Chris:
Are there any ideas you’ve got around, how to virtually bring those people into the fall with their coworkers, so that they don’t feel that sense of loneliness or feel like they are contributing and getting the Kudos that they deserve from their colleagues?

James:
Yes. So again, keeping this sort of simple in a way is this two model. One is the productivity layer and one is the experience layer or the differentiator. The productivity layer, I was saying just now that we’ve really got hybrid workplaces where you have some people together, some people will know or even coming in at different times so that our productivity layer, the first thing you need to do is deploy technologies that increase the level of transparency around the work that’s happening. So I’m talking about things here as simple as a Yammer Group or it could be a bit of bit more task orientated around a digital Kanban board. It also includes giving people access, direct access and self service model of having common fall areas so that you can get to the information you need. But what we want to do is not force people to go through a gatekeeper to either get a project updates or information they need.

James:
We also need to steer away from having long status update meetings and really use the meeting time to have more useful or problem solving or strategic conversations around the work that’s happening. We want to get rid of Administrivia basically, the minoosh of work, which you can kind of afford to waste time in the workplace and have it come. No one likes long meetings anyway. The good thing about this is it works for everyone. It doesn’t matter whether you’re in the office, out of the office, if you focus on this transparency of work through technology actually helps everyone. But that’s just that first level. The next level is really more around that social cohesion. I think there are opportunities to use some of the work tools themselves, but also to look at specialty tools that encourage and support social cohesion.

James:
Is a whole number of different areas that you could focus on. But I’ve wrapped this up in an idea that I’ve been talking about in the last sort of 18 months or so, which is this idea of the digital place making for the workplace. Placemaking comes out of urban design and it’s about trying to reactivate a common space into areas that communities that people can actually use in a more productive and communal fashion. And what we’ve seen over time is actually in the workplace, we’re seeing these ideas come in and it’s crossover as well from digital communities of sort of a community management idea where people are trying to activate the workplace with nonproductive kind of activity in a way. Social activity.

Chris:
What’s the table tennis type of, for example?

James:
Table. Yes, all those things. So it could be a thing. It could be an activity. Let’s take that to the next level and then thinking about how can we do this at a digital level so that we’re not thinking about how to activate a single physical space or place within your workplace, like with that pinball table, because that only helps the people who were there at the same time. What can we do to do this when we’ve got teams of people that could be, again, working from different offices, working from home at different times? Maybe it’s a digital pinball table you put in place.

Chris:
I like it.

James:
There’s all sorts of things here and really we’re only limited by our imagination. The simplest thing might be to allow some social sharing within again, within a forum, but there are other ideas. There are the little apps that can organize a sort of a roulette of meetings to encourage you to get to know people you don’t know very well.

Chris:
iNTeresting.

James:
There are ideas, like wormhole cameras that create a continuous connection between different places. Again, the sky’s the limit on the sorts of things you might want to do.

Chris:
Absolutely. This runs onto another idea I’ve been thinking about. I love the idea of casual collisions that led to conversations. Like you’re around the water bubbler talking about the 40 or in the office kitchen. But if we’re all working remotely or just linked by a screens, I feel out the art of this, the casual collision kind of dies, but I feel like what you’re talking about here, you might be able to extrapolate that out and recreate those in a virtual world. Would do you think that would work?

James:
Well, if definitely, and this is part of it, if you’ve heard of nudge theory, the idea is that we’re trying to create opportunities for that kind of collision and we’re looking for digital interventions that might allow apps. So a chat roulette for example. Now those meaning roulette or coffee meetups is one way of doing that. And again, it works regardless of whether it’s a purely remote digital work community or a hybrid community. You can organize these in different ways, but that’s what it’s all about. And this is the interesting thing when you talk to architects and interior designers, as physical space, physical workplaces. One of the things they’ve been trying to organize throughout, I know the last five decades of the modern workplace, is to create serendipity. I think there’s a really interesting opportunity here for us to cross over and serve both purposes.

James:
If you design a physical space and you might… Again, the pinball machine may actually be put in place with an organization to create the chance of random encounters. But again, it only works if people know about it if they’re at the same time together. What we want to do is probably nudge better use of those physical assets. So digital placemaking for the workplace as a role there. But equally what we’re saying is, if people aren’t going to have the opportunity ever to meet physically or only occasionally, then let’s look at the digital realm and create some other opportunities for those random encounters.

Chris:
Might as someone who loves to have a chat, I really am enjoying this aspect of our talking today cause I think it’s just such a such a valuable thing.

James:
I do want to create this link back to the intelligent workplace because I see us collecting data from a physical workplace is in our digital workplaces, but we’ve yet to really join the dots on those two things. And there were solutions like swoop analytics that will go into your Yammer or workplace by Facebook communities and look at the social network of connections between the people that participate in those online forums. They can help you, again, improve how you use those environments. Now on the other side, again, there are solutions that are starting to also collect information about how space is being used. And there is links to the way you position people. Hey, you sit people together within an organization, you may actually then find that you can change those arrangements to improve innovation. If you think about my ideal intelligent workplace, and again, we’ve got to deal with the creepy big brother aspects of this, we’ve got to make that work for people, right? And so that’s a valid concern.

James:
But if we can bring what we know about people, how they work together in those digital layers, your email, Yammer, whatever it might be, Microsoft teams look at those behaviors and then we can say, well, let’s actually see how else they might may or may not be working together. If you bring that information together, we can actually increase the efficiency and effectiveness of our workplaces.

Chris:
Let’s move on to mental health and wellbeing because that’s a huge consideration in today’s workplaces and the intelligent workplace really needs to consider it. Have you seen some companies who have been really embracing this element?

James:
First of all, I think it’s fair to say the most progressive organizations are really embracing the need to focus on health and wellbeing.

Chris:
For sure.

James:
That might be addressed at a company policy level. It could be addressed through, how the terms and conditions of employment and then also the services that they bring, that they offer to employees to help address health and wellbeing. There are actually technology solutions that focus on different aspects of these. I might talk more about some of the ideas of the solutions rather than particular examples because it’s quite a mixed bag, you know, organizations doing different things across the board. If we look at then the technology solutions that I’m saying appear to support this, these range from… And this is one of my favorite ideas is an app that encourages you to go out and have a meeting outdoors, to have a walking meeting or go to the park near office and have a meeting. Even getting people out of the office and talking to each other in a different environment that can support health and wellbeing.

James:
We’ve also obviously also had for a while the idea of corporate health program. So you can track the number of steps or you have challenges amongst teams that have some kind of physical activity or maybe it might be to do with diet, those sorts of issues around wellbeing. Then we’re also seeing other solutions that will even help you measure and monitor the impact of different initiatives around health and wellbeing to see what’s actually working. Again, that can support a whole range of different things, not just digital but around mental health in particular. What concerns me the most. when you look at the ability of an organization to serve a large cohort of employees is the risk that someone who’s maybe a head office is in at work every day. They may be very well aware of the services available and they may find it easy to access them, but if you work part time or you’re working remotely, then your chance of maybe utilizing some of those services might get that a little bit harder.

James:
Luckily, we’re actually seeing people starting to offer solutions that address that issue of scale and access. This might sound odd, but some of those include chatbots for mental health benefits in the workplace. And the great thing about that is, it’s private, it’s infinitely scalable, but I think what I find really interesting about that approach around using a tool like that to do, is that it also can be tailored to the individual. It’s not just about having a poster or a cohort to improve your workplace mental health. You can actually have a tool that can try and understand the things you need and give you some feedback. The other point of that is also around the privacy is that, you can have a private conversation with that Chat Bot. You actually have to talk to a colleague about the issue if you’re not comfortable in doing that. I think there’s some really interesting opportunities across this whole spectrum of health and wellbeing and definitely mental health shouldn’t be forgotten. I think you really…. If you think about it as well as it’s also having that proactive approach.

James:
Some of the tools that people would have access to already in their workplace. If you can target things around social support. Social support is about addressing things like workplace loneliness. It’s also about building up that network of people. You may have done a workplace survey that asked you if you have a best friend at work because that’s often an indicator of your level of engagement and wellbeing. When you think that digital tool can do to help foster that, that community I think is a good thing. Now, Chris, either on a freelancer, so I don’t have colleagues as such, but I can tell you I do have a quite a vast network through different channels of people I know I’ve met physically and other people I haven’t met physically.

James:
I’ve got virtual water coolers that I can find 24?7 there’s someone in the world that I can have a chat with. And I think again, these though that idea can apply in the workplace. You might be the only person of a particular job type in your part of the business, but you should better find someone through a virtual channel who shares the same background and interests.

Chris:
I’m not sure about you, but I feel like my life is absolutely scheduled down to the last second, work commitment to children and the wife, all that sort of thing. And I find I have to sometimes I’m scheduled downtimes in [inaudible 00:22:05] and with my wife, I have to tell her to take lunch. So maybe the intelligent workplace can start to look at people’s calendars and start to block things out on their behalf for the betterment of their mental health.

James:
Definitely. This is that role of intelligent layer that nudges and the feedback that can help you to look at how you’re performing, I think can be really helpful. It’s always a balance. As I said, there’s a big brother idea, do we want a robot system to actually tell us something. But sometimes that feedback can be really useful. I’m not opposed to automation and also not opposed to the idea of having some human element to that intervention as well. I think this is again where it comes back to that creativity and also looking at this holistically because I can… Your system can feed back to you, Chris, that you’re spending too much time recording podcasts. Okay. All right. And you can get notice.

Chris:
Point taken.

James:
Point taken if the other people you work with are all spending their time doing the same thing, that creates an environment where even if you believe, if you go, yeah, I am actually now I’ve looked at what I’m doing, I’m spending far too much time doing X or Y. But if everyone else is still doing X and Y it’s can be really hard for you to stop.

Chris:
Yes.

James:
The technology in this context can only really support us if it’s backed up by the culture. This is where the technology and people is really intwined. Technology maybe can not just towards a certain behavior, but the environment has to support that. And again, this is where, if you think about it, you’ve got a system that gives you feedback about your performance or maybe the bad habits it observes. You’re emailing people at one o’clock in the morning. That’s not good. Okay. But it can only go so far if those behaviors aren’t being modeled. This is where things like Yammer and workplace by Facebook, and of course that the face to face interaction that goes on even email, how leaders in particular manages, how they act in those online forums. And when you’re face to face, they’re the things that set the expectations of behavior. So we have to look at a range of different, if you like, channels and solutions to help us achieve our goals. There’s not a silver bullet. We can’t just put a [crosstalk 00:24:28] because… And nothing happens. I said nothing happens in isolation.

Chris:
Yes, absolutely. That is what the intelligent workplace use. That’s what’s so hard to define and it’s just continually growing because there are so many small bits and pieces that come together a bit like a bird’s nest to create this fantastic user experience.

James:
That’s correct. It’s not a solution. The ideal intelligent workplace is really backed up as a vision and a goal that we want to achieve, and then we have to work through a process of designing the right bits of that puzzle for your particular workplace, your organization, what’s going to make that work for you. You’re going to need lots of different solutions depending on the level of diversity within your workplace. How many officers do you have? What kind of work styles need to be supported, frontline versus back office roles, all those different things. Every workplace will be different, but we can all create… We can all be moving in the direction of visualizing, identifying what the intelligent workplace goal should be and then we can start to gradually bring all those parts together.

Chris:
There you go. See, that’s why I got you on here cause we’re starting to build a picture of what this thing could be. Fantastic. They might look up, I’ve purposely focused a lot on the people element with you today. Because, in future episodes I want to hone in on the guests area of expertise or passion within the intelligent workplace. But I also know that you’re a bit of a visionary in this area. Let’s just spend the last few minutes together going a little bit blue sky with the idea. I want to ask you, how far do you think we can go with this intelligent workplace and what technology do you think will be the most influential?

James:
Pretty good question.

Chris:
Thank you.

James:
Part of me wants to say… It’s not a question of how far it’s actually how well, right? If you think about it as a productivity, probably emphasizes this a little bit. It’s about the quality and the experience is really about not being…. It’s really about your imagination about all the different ways we could do this. But I think one of the fundamental changes I think we have ahead of us in terms of how far can this intelligent workplace go is really, we’re seeing gradually but slow… It’s definitely there a shift from being based on work being a matter of how much time you spend in the workplace. So the nine to five day for example. Now whether or not things like universal income we’ll really get adopted on mass is… I don’t know.

James:
But we do know that with a growing contingent workforce as we actually have more people working longer and with more experience and with strong networks to support them, more and more people are going to want to work in a freelance model like I do.

Chris:
Yes.

James:
The actual nature of work is changing. We’re definitely moving to more project and outcome based work at least at that professional end. I’m not really talking about, if you’re working in a takeaway or serving in a supermarket, those kinds of roles are going to be around for a while as well. But I’m talking about the professional workforce is how we are working is changing. So the issue is, can our digital tools support that new way of working? And that’s going to require us to have systems that are open because, if you’re employing a team that’s made up of people who are freelancers, some might work for you, some might even work for a partner business partner. How can we get them together and work effectively? I think the really bit, how far can we go? O top of that, then we can layer all the cool stuff. You know, augmented reality, voice interfaces, chat bots. But I think the primary underlying driver is how do we actually adapt our current enterprise tools so they actually fit to work in a more project and outcome based economy.

Chris:
You’re getting me very excited for what the future might hold. Now the final question. On this podcast, I want to ask every one of my guests the same question at the end of these interviews and I’m going to refer to it as the billion dollar question. James, watch the machines are doing all the work. What will humans do? Are we destined to become the pits of AI in the future?

James:
Well, I think that makes for great science fiction. I don’t think so. I’m over a school of thought that thinks that humans will always stay one step ahead of the machines. We’ve already been through a couple of different economic revolutions, the most recent being the industrial revolution. And we gradually moving from that phase into a new phase perhaps. It’s just a more focused and intensive repeat of that industrialization, but you know, more and more automation, it’s going to change the nature of work, no doubt. But we have other pressing problems. Like the environment to solve for as well. I think there’s going to be a need for creativity and skills. What’s going to happen is that, the need for repetitive work that’s going to be automated even for further. So what’s left though is going to be things that computers are just not either good at dealing with or… And this is, I think that again, my point about humans always being one step ahead.

James:
Humans will change if you like the value proposition. Do you want to have mass produced repetitive solutions or do you want that handcrafted solution? We always seeing it a little bit of that trend. I think things will keep moving for the better. I’m hopeful and I think we’re just going to have to see it again. There will be changes, but the… More and more automation doesn’t mean that there’s no role for humans. I’m positive on that front.

Chris:
You’re telling me that terminates a rise of the machines was based on fiction not fact?

James:
Well, I hope so. [crosstalk 00:30:01] I just have switched off [inaudible 00:30:05] she’s not listening so she can’t hear this plotting and scheming [inaudible 00:30:09].

Chris:
Good. Well, might look. Thank you so much for being my first guest on this new podcast series. I’ve really enjoyed our 30 odd minutes together today. I’m learning a lot. It has been absolutely fantastic. So thank you very much. And hopefully we’ll talk again soon about the intelligent workplace [inaudible 00:30:26].

James:
Thanks, Chris.

Chris:
[inaudible 00:30:27]

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What employees CRAVE from their workplace

Gregg Lederman was described to me by a colleague, as a must have on this podcast. He is also the founder of Brand Integrity, a leadership development and employee engagement company and has 20 years of experience working within organisation on implementing engagement solutions.

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